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Rediscovering basic foods: legumes, cereals

Rediscovering basic foods: legumes, cereals

These are the basic foods, from Antiquity to the present day. Legumes, cereals and fabaceae have always kept people safe from famine, providing them with the best of their nutritional resources. How and where do these plants grow, and how can we accommodate them? We invite you to rediscover them through these few simple questions.

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Lentils ** Lentils are said to be one of the first vegetables cultivated by humans. This legume with many varieties is one of the richest in protein, that is to say! If we especially know it in its green form - the famous Puy lens -, we also find red, brown or even coral variations (our photo). Only green and red lentils are grown in our countries. They can be tasted as an accompaniment or in the form of soups, purees or salads.

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Pea ** Pea is a legume whose culture is ancient. We can eat it in the form of a pod - snow peas or gourmet peas -, fresh - it's our pea -, or dry. In the latter form, it is "broken", that is to say separated from its slightly digestible seed coat. You can then consume it in delicious soups!

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Corn ** Native to Mexico, corn is, for the Amerindians, the equivalent of our wheat. It is also the most cultivated cereal in the world! It thrives in rich, moist soils and in hot climates. It is now widely cultivated in France, as a forage crop. It is a plant particularly rich in starch that is found in multiple forms: in fresh ear that can be grilled or chewed as it is, in flour, salad, semolina ...

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Le petit épeautre ** This ancient cereal, sometimes presented as the ancestor of wheat, is native to Mediterranean regions. In France, Haute-Provence has made it a specialty. The grain of small spelled is of equivalent size to that of wheat, but it is distinguished by its shape, more slender and not split. Its nutritional assets are its richness in lipids and fibers and its low gluten content. It is mainly eaten in soups, salads or as an accompaniment.

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Quinoa ** Close to cereals by its carbohydrate content, quinoa belongs to the Chenopodiaceae family. It owes its excellent nutritional reputation to its content of essential amino acids which makes it an ideal food for vegetarians. This plant native to South America, which appreciates an arid environment and a poor soil, can acclimatize in our countries. In the kitchen, it is surprisingly versatile. As comfortable in both savory and sweet preparations, quinoa is found in a variety of forms: flakes, seeds, flour, cream…

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Soybeans ** Soybeans belong to the fabaceae family. This plant native to south-east Asia enjoys warm climates and moist soils. Its nutritional reputation is well established: rich in protein, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Soy gives rise to various culinary preparations: sauce, oil, milk…

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** Chickpea ** Chickpea is a popular legume in the Mediterranean regions. It is distinguished by its richness in carbohydrates and proteins. It is eaten as a side dish in couscous, mashed potatoes, in soups, or even in the form of flour, which makes delicious pancakes.

Dry vegetables


J-F. Mahé ** The white bean ** The bean is a legume native to America and belongs to the fabaceae family. It is cultivated in different forms: dwarf, oar, pod, grain ... Its colors are even more varied: white, yellow, pink, red, black ... For many populations, it is the basis of food due of its richness in carbohydrates, fibers, proteins and mineral salts. According to culinary traditions, beans give rise to various preparations, both savory and sweet.